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Visit Detroit Fall 2015 & Winter 2016

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38 | VISIT DETROIT | FALL 2015 & WINTER 2016 A City Turned Canvas more to see, more to love Look to the right when passing the Russell Industrial Center on 1-75 North between East Grand Boulevard and Clay Street to see artist Kobie Solomon's Detroit Chimera mural • Detroit artist Jerome Ferretti painted one of the murals at Mercury Burger Bar in Corktown and at Whole Foods in Midtown • Eatery Brooklyn St. Local in Corktown hired the artist commonly known as Reyes to create its abstract building wall art. The Alley Project transformed a neighborhood alley and surrounding vacant lots into an inspirational graffiti art gallery with partners Young Nation and the Detroit Collaborative Design Center. Meanwhile, the Southwest Urban Arts Mural Project (SUAMP) in nearby Springwells Village, the heart of which is at the intersec- tion of Springwells Street and Vernor Highway, focuses on the transformative power of hiring creative young people to reduce the blight around them. Local businesses such as DTE Energy and Fresh-Pak commission murals to advertise or brighten up their buildings. Then neighbor- hood artists ranging in age from 14 to 23 earn an hourly wage for everything from writing busi- ness plans to designing murals to actually spraying and brushing the paint on the walls. During summer break, the artists work in teams to complete murals that extend over their heads and stretch a couple hundred feet down the street. They finish each piece with anti-graffiti sealant, but Christine Bell, who is the human development director for the SUAMP parent company, Urban Neighborhood Initiatives, said that would-be vandals respect the kids' work. The result is one of Detroit's densest collections of public murals. And also a way to engage kids creatively, allowing them to earn money for something they love doing. CCS' Carducci said that nurtur- ing the next generation of artists is key to the continued beautifica- tion of the city — in a way that is uniquely Detroit. "You couldn't do this anywhere else," he said of the current street art scene. "There's no other city with the footprint, the open space and the heritage that Detroit offers." • LOOKING UP Play I Spy as you make your way around town. John Sauve's Man in the City project puts a spotlight on public art education. You can spot some 30 orange men peering on rooftops around the city. A top few locations: • The Park Shelton, Midtown on Kirby Street • Detroit Opera House, downtown on Broadway Street • The Majestic Theatre, downtown on Woodward Avenue • The Old Shillelagh, near Greektown on Monroe Avenue • Supino Pizzeria, Eastern Market on Russell Street RISING FROM THE RUINS Drawing 275,000 visitors annually, The Heidelberg Project is artist Tyree Guyton's urban ode to diversity, discussion and taking action. "Medicine for the community," he has said. Spanning two city blocks on the lower east side, the art installation has been heralded as Detroit's Ghetto Guggenheim and was recently awarded the No. 4 spot in the USA Today's 10Best Readers' Choice survey for Best Art District. OFF THE BEATEN PATH African bead curator and historian Olayami Dabls has covered an abandoned building with a kaleidoscope of beads and mirrors, and has established an outdoor found-object art exhibit called Iron Teaching Rocks How to Rust — a metaphor for one culture imposing itself on another. ALL THIS WAS TREES In 2010, a painting was discovered among the rubble at Detroit's abandoned Packard Automotive Plant. Rumor had it that the stencil of a boy holding a can of red paint next to the words, "I remember when all this was trees" was the work of Banksy, the infamous British graffiti artist. The 555 Nonprofit Gallery and Studios in southwest Detroit moved the cinder block wall to its space to preserve it. The mural was scheduled for auction by California-based Julien's Auctions in September 2015. THERE'S MORE! pinterest.com/plutoniumpaint/detroit-public-art OFF-THE-WALL ON THE WALL Structures and empty spaces become the perfect canvas for out-of-bounds imagery. From top: The Alley Project in southwest Detroit, a mural from street artists Hygienic Dress League along the Dequindre Cut and wall art in the Grand River Creative Corridor. ART ALL ABOUT A City Turned Canvas 38 | VISIT DETROIT | FALL 2015 & WINTER 2016

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